Pond Inlet, Nunavut (Baffin Island)

After sailing for a day and a half we arrived at Pond Inlet at the North end of Baffin Island. Baffin Island is 950 miles long and about 450 wide with a total population of about 19,500. At Pond Inlet we are at latitude 72 which is 300 miles North of the Arctic Circle. Now it is evening tho’ the sun is brightly shining and we have departed Pond Inlet heading North again. It’s hard to imagine living in a place like Pond Inlet tho’ the people we met were lovely and mostly spoke English. The total population is under 2000 and is 95% Inuit, there are no trees or pavement and, for the most part it is a community of hunters & fishermen… they are hard workers and are determined to preserve their Native culture.

It’s a miracle I was able to upload 7 images from today’s adventure… I have a feeling our internet access is going to get slower pretty quickly now but I will certainly keep posting as I am able. Thank you so much for reading and commenting… it definitely helps to feel connected to my family & friends.

Arriving at Pond Inlet (Baffin Island)

Arriving at Pond Inlet (Baffin Island)

Zodiacs take us back and forth from ship to shore.

Zodiacs take us back and forth from ship to shore.

Nunavut Library/Museum and City Center is designed to look like an iceberg!

Nunavut Library/Museum and City Center is designed to look like an iceberg!

One of the exhibits at the museum/library/city center

One of the exhibits at the museum/library/city center

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Looking back at our ship from shore

Looking back at our ship from shore

3 thoughts on “Pond Inlet, Nunavut (Baffin Island)

  1. Barren land maybe, but I’ll bet the sea is (or was? ) productive. Thanks for posting Claire…that photo with the welcome sign appears to show written Inuit ?

    • Yes, the sea is extremely productive! Tons of varieties of fish, narwhal, whales, 5 types of seals (used for making water-proof boots), walrus and more… hunting & fishing limits are controlled by the government. The sign is in their tribal language but I am unsure of the name of it.

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